12 Ago Austerity, gentrification and big tunes: why unlawful raves are flourishing

Austerity, gentrification and big tunes: why unlawful raves are flourishing

Amid disillusionment with main-stream clubbing, unlawful occasions are harking back into the spirit that is original of – but police maintain they've been as dangerous and unlawful as ever

Dancers at a squat celebration in London’s King’s Cross, October 2019. Photograph: Wil Crisp

Dancers at a squat celebration in London’s King’s Cross, October 2019. Photograph: Wil Crisp

We t’s one hour after midnight on New Year’s Day 2020, and a blast of revellers is gathering in an alleyway next to KFC on London’s Old Kent path. They pass between heaps of automobile tyres and via a gap in a gate where team, covered with caps and scarves, are using ?5 records from every person who goes into the yard of a recently abandoned Carpetright warehouse.

In, the lights take and sets of partygoers are huddled in groups talking, waiting and smoking being a sound that is behemoth and makeshift club are built against one wall surface. Across the street, in a bigger abandoned warehouse that has been previously a workplace Outlet, a much larger audio system has been built.

There’s a sense of expectation due to the fact warehouse fills up with mohawked punks, tracksuited squatters, crusties, rude males, accountants, graphic artists, pupils, and grey-haired veteran techno heads.

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